Skip to Navigation
    Misericordia University
   
 
  Oct 22, 2017
 
2017-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 
  
2017-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

Speech-Language Pathology MS


Return to Academic Program Listings Return to: Academic Program Listings

Speech-Language Pathology Major

College of Health Sciences and Education
Department Chair Glen Tellis, PhD

Faculty

Lori Cimino, Assistant Professor, BS Marywood University, Pennsylvania; MS Bloomsburg University, Pennsylvania

Jessica Kisenwether, Assistant Professor, MS Misericordia University; PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania

Adina S. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, BA Indiana University; MA Boston University

Kathleen Scaler-Scott, Associate Professor, BA Rutgers University, New Jersey; MS Emerson College, Boston, Massachusetts; PhD, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana

Cari Tellis, Professor, BA The Pennsylvania State University; MS University of Pittsburgh; PhD, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Glen Tellis, Professor, BS St. Xavier’s College, Bombay, India; MA California State University, Fresno, California; PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania

Ruixia Yan, Associate Professor, BA and MA Shanxi University, China; PhD, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana

Introduction

The speech-language pathology program is a five-year, professional master’s degree program with admission in the first year. Students admitted as first year or undergraduate transfers who successfully complete all major and university requirements are awarded a BS degree in health sciences in addition to a MS degree in speech-language pathology. Students who have baccalaureate degrees-whether in communication disorders or another field-are conferred the MS degree in speech-language pathology upon completion of all requirements but do not receive the BS in health science.

For traditional five year and transfer students, the program’s first two years of study provide a strong foundation in the liberal arts and sciences, appropriate breadth to develop the ability in students to think independently, weigh values, and understand fundamental theory. This further serves to develop skills of critical thinking and communication, inherent in baccalaureate education and essential to professional socialization. The speech-language pathology professional curriculum is initiated in the fourth year and continues through the fifth year.

The program is guided by the accreditation and certification standards put forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) as the accrediting agency for entry-level speech-language pathology programs. Graduates of programs accredited by ASHA are eligible to apply for national certification by ASHA and for state licensure as speech-language pathologists in the individual United States and territories in which licensure is mandated.

The master of science education program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310 Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

Mission

The Speech-Language Pathology program is committed to providing an educational experience which produces competent speech-language pathologists who are critical thinkers and educated consumers of research, and which prepares its graduate students for productive careers in speech-language pathology and as advocates for, and participants in, life-long learning. As an entry-level professional program, the speech-language pathology curriculum reflects a commitment to the complementary relationship between liberal arts and professional studies that enables graduates to adapt to constantly evolving societal and professional needs that includes distance/digital education. The Department of Speech-Language Pathology is committed to the provision of affordable, quality professional education that expresses the founding Sisters’ values and attitudes of hospitality, justice, mercy, and service.

The overall goal is to develop a well-rounded empathetic competent professional who will provide the highest quality of care to individuals with communication disorders.

Philosophy

The speech-language pathology department is based on the belief that graduates of entry-level allied health professional programs should possess the clinical decision making and problem solving skills which enable them to function as peer colleagues in the contemporary, dynamic health care and educational systems. Speech-language pathologists need to be sensitive to the needs of a culturally diverse society as evident in their interactions with clients, families, and fellow health care and education professionals in the community in which they practice.

An educational program for speech-language pathologists should reflect the concepts of androgogy (adult education) to include problem solving, critical thinking and analysis, integration of theory and practice, clinical decision making, mentoring, and self-directed learning.

Speech-language pathologists should have the ability to articulate and exchange knowledge, and seek additional knowledge and skills. They should also have the ability and desire to remain open to input from and collaboration with other health care and education professionals. Speech-language pathologists value collaboration and communication in a spirit of mutual collegiality among health care and education providers as essential to meeting the health care needs of society.

A speech-language pathology professional education program prepares students to be practicing generalists but also provides graduates with the tools that enable them to develop specialty expertise through the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills and a wholistic approach to health care.

The academic and clinical faculty and the academic and clinical education environments must reflect and foster professional values and behaviors. The academic and clinical faculty and curriculum components must be inextricably linked for the provision of professional education programs preparing competent health care practitioners.

A diverse faculty whose members have responsibilities and activities consistent with their areas of teaching and scholarly expertise strengthens and enhances a professional education program in speech-language pathology.

Goals

The goals of the speech-language pathology department at Misericordia University are to prepare graduates who:

  1. Engage in contemporary, competent, legal, and ethical practice.
  2. Value the critical inquiry in the validation and advancement of the science of speech-language pathology and audiology.
  3. Describe the roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists as professionally autonomous practitioners within the health care and educational systems.
  4. Accept the responsibility for education of self, the community, the profession, clients, and colleagues in the health care and educational systems.
  5. Value and foster communication and interaction with colleagues for the benefit of optimal service to clients with communication disorders.
  6. Respect and respond to contemporary bio-psycho-social diversity in interactions with clients, families, colleagues, and the community.

It is the mission of the speech-language pathology program to educate and prepare students who will be ethical and competent clinicians in the provision of services to persons with speech-language-hearing disorders.

Program Objectives

To ensure that graduates of the speech-language pathology program will be prepared for their professional roles and responsibilities, the following are the program’s curriculum objectives. Upon successful completion of the speech-language pathology program, graduates will be able to:

  1. Provide prevention, screening, consultation, assessment and diagnosis, treatment, intervetion, management, counseling, and follow-up services for disorders of:
    1. speech (i.e., articulation, fluency, resonance, and voice including aeromechanical components of respiration).
    2. language (i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatic/social aspects of communication) including comprehension and expression in oral, written, graphic, and manual modalities; language processing; preliteracy and language-based literacy skills, including phonological awareness.
    3. swallowing or other upper aerodigestive functions such as infant feeding and aeromechanical events (evaluation of esophageal function is for the purpose of referral to medical professionals).
    4. cognitive aspects of communication (e.g., attention, memory, problem solving, executive functions).
    5. sensory awareness related to communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions.
  2. Establish augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques and strategies including developing, selecting, and prescribing of such systems and devices (e.g., speech generating devices).
  3. Provide services to individuals with hearing loss and their families/caregivers (e.g., auditory training; speech reading; speech and language intervention secondary to hearing loss).
  4. Screen hearing of individuals who can participate in conventional pure-tone air conduction methods, as well as screening for middle ear pathology through screening tympanometry for the purpose of referral of individuals for further evaluation and management.
  5. Use instrumentation (e.g., videofluoroscopy, EMG, nasendoscopy, stroboscopy, computer technology) to observe, collect data, and measure parameters of communication and swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions in accordance with the principles of evidence-based practice.
  6. Select, fit, and establish effective use of prosthetic/adaptive devices for communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions (e.g., tracheoesophageal prostheses, speaking valves, electrolarynges). This does not include sensory devices used by individuals with hearing loss or other auditory perceptual deficits.
  7. Collaborate in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders and providing intervention where there is evidence of speech, language, and/or other cognitive-communication disorders.
  8. Educate and counsel individuals, families, co-workers, educators, and other persons in the community regarding acceptance, adaptation, and decision making about communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive concerns.
  9. Advocate for individuals through community awareness, education, and training programs to promote and facilitate access to full participation in communication, including the elimination of societal barriers.
  10. Collaborate with and provide referrals and information to audiologists, educators, and other health professionals as individual needs dictate.
  11. Address behaviors (e.g., perseverative or disruptive actions) and environments (e.g., seating, positioning for swallowing safety or attention, communication opportunities) that affect communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions.
  12. Provide services to modify or enhance communication performance (e.g., accent modification, transgendered voice, care and improvement of the professional voice, personal/professional communication effectiveness).
  13. Recognize the need to provide and appropriately accommodate diagnostic and treatment services to individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds and adjust treatment and assessment services accordingly.
  14. Be critical consumers of professional literature.
  15. Accept responsibility for service to one’s fellow human beings.

The academic curriculum, practicum experiences, research requirement, and service activity requirements that students must complete in this program have been designed and will be implemented in a way that will ensure that graduates meet or exceed these objectives. The net result of the student’s educational experience in this program will be a well-prepared, service-oriented, competent professional who is fully prepared and eligible for ASHA certification as a speech-language pathologist.

Undergraduate Program in Speech-language Pathology

Students may enter the undergraduate speech-language pathology program in one of two ways: (1) as traditional five-year students who have graduated from high school but have not yet entered college, or (2) as students who have entered college and have taken speech-language pathology courses at other colleges or universities and wish to transfer, or have either chosen a different major or have not selected a major but wish to transfer into the speech-language pathology program.

Admission of Traditional Five-Year Students

Students must have graduated from high school but have not yet entered college. For these students, the speech-language pathology curriculum is a 5 year program leading to the baccalaureate degree at the completion of the fourth year of study and the master’s degree at the conclusion of the fifth year. Prospective undergraduate applicants must meet both Misericordia University’s and the speech-language pathology department’s admissions criteria. For more information, please see applying to the speech-language pathology program section of this catalog.

Admission of Transfer Students

Students may seek admission into the program as a transfer, either from another department at Misericordia University or another institution of higher learning. Applications for admission of transfer students will be considered on a competitive, space-available basis. All students accepted into the program as undergraduate transfers must meet Misericordia University’s requirements for a baccalaureate degree by taking the necessary coursework to ensure compliance with the requirements.

Advancement to the Undergraduate Speech-language Pathology Program

For both traditional five-year students and transfer students, advancement to the undergraduate program (traditionally the junior year) is continuous. Students who are admitted to the program take Speech-language Pathology undergraduate courses in their freshmen, sophomore, and junior years.

Advancement to Graduate Study in Speech-language Pathology

To advance to the graduate portion of the speech-language pathology program (typically the senior and fifth years of study), students must:

  1. Have an overall GPA of at least 3.5 at the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year. This GPA must be maintained until the completion of the master’s program (end of the 5th year).
  2. Receive a grade of “C-” or better in the undergraduate speech-language pathology courses.
  3. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses taken prior to the senior year (first year graduate school).

Advancement within the Graduate Portion of the Speech-language Pathology Program

To advance from the first year (traditionally the senior year) to the second year (traditionally the fifth year) of study, students must

  1. Have an overall GPA of at least 3.5 at the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year. This GPA must be maintained until the completion of master’s program (end of the 5th year).
  2. Receive a grade of “B-” or better in all graduate level academic courses (500 and 600 level). Any students who receive a “C+” or lower in any graduate level academic course (excluding clinic) have one opportunity to retake that course and receive a “B-” or better. Failure to achieve a grade of “B-” or better in that repeated course will result in dismissal from the program. Students who receive a “C+” or lower in two or more 500 and/or 600 level academic courses regardless of cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed academic class, will be dismissed from the program. Students who receive a “C+” grade or lower in two academic courses in one semester will be dismissed from the program and will not have the opportunity to retake those courses regardless of cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed class.
  3. Students who receive a” C+” grade or lower in an academic course and “B-” or lower in a 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork in the same semester, will be dismissed from the program regardless of cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed class or clinic/fieldwork. Students who receive a “C+” grade or lower in an academic course and “B-” or lower in a 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork in 2 separate semesters, will be dismissed from the program regardless of cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed class or clinic/fieldwork.
  4. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses taken during the senior year and fifth year.

Applying to the Speech-language Pathology Program

A potential applicant can enter the program in speech-language pathology under one of four circumstances, they are as follows:

  1. a traditional student who has been accepted into the 5-year program;
  2. an undergraduate transfer who has not been conferred a baccalaureate degree;
  3. a graduate holding the baccalaureate degree with communication sciences and disorders;
  4. a graduate holding the baccalaureate degree in a major other than communication sciences and disorders-post-baccalaureate non-major.

Traditional Students

These students have graduated from high school but have not yet entered college. For these students, the speech-language pathology curriculum is a 5-year program leading simultaneously to the baccalaureate and master’s degrees.

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Prospective undergraduate applicants must meet both Misericordia University’s and the speech-language pathology department’s admission criteria.

Misericordia University’s general criteria for acceptance into an undergraduate program are:

  1. Evidence of the completion of 16 Carnegie Units, or evidence of a high school equivalency diploma.
  2. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) program.
  3. A letter of recommendation from the high school principal, a guidance counselor, or a teacher.

The speech-language pathology department includes additional admissions criteria. Traditional students entering the 5-year program must have the following criteria to be considered for acceptance into the speech-language pathology department:

  1. Preference will be given to students who have graduated in the top 1/3 of their high school graduating class or achieved a minimum combined SAT score of 1000 or the equivalent ACT score with a minimum 3.0 GPA.
  2. The student must provide an essay of no more than 500 words indicating why the student wishes to pursue a career in speech-language pathology.

Evidence of exposure through volunteerism or service-learning related to working with children and adults is highly desirable.

Graduate Admission Requirements

Graduate study begins in the fourth (traditionally the senior) year and continues through to the fifth year of study. For traditional students to advance to graduate study, certain prerequisite criteria must be met:

  1. Maintain an overall cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 at the end of the fall semester of the junior year. This GPA must be maintained until the completion of the spring semester of the junior year and throughout the graduate program (senior and fifth year).
  2. Receive a grade of “C-” or better in the undergraduate speech-language pathology courses.
  3. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses taken prior to the senior year (first year graduate school).
    1. Students begin their speech-language pathology courses in their freshman year and will typically complete all undergraduate coursework by their junior year. Upon completion of each semester, the progress of each student in terms of which course objectives were and were not mastered during that semester will be reviewed.
    2. For any course objectives not mastered, the student will be given an assignment to assist them in mastering those objectives. Students cannot take graduate level coursework if they have not mastered all objectives.

Once criteria (1) through (3) above are successfully met, the candidate is automatically granted permission to commence to graduate study (i.e., there is no need for the student to make a formal application to graduate school).

Undergraduate Transfer Students

These students are individuals who have completed college-level courses either at Misericordia University or another institution of higher education, and who have a major other than speech-language pathology, but would like to major in speech-language pathology.

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Students who transfer into the program, either from another academic unit within the university or from another institution of higher education, also will be required to meet the department’s admission criteria. Students will be required to meet Misericordia University’s requirements for a baccalaureate degree by taking the necessary coursework to ensure compliance with the requirements. Please refer to undergraduate admission requirements for traditional students. A recommendation letter from a current professor may be substituted for a letter from a principal, guidance counselor, or teacher.

Undergraduate students who are currently at Misericordia University must apply directly to the Speech-Language Pathology Department. The applications of these students should include the required documents from the admission requirements for traditional undergraduate students as well as Misericordia University transcripts.

Graduate Admission Requirements

Please refer to graduate admission requirements for traditional students.

Post-Baccalaureate Majors

These students have earned a baccalaureate degree in communication sciences and disorders or speech-language pathology and are eligible for direct entry into the graduate program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia University.

Graduate Admission Requirements

Students who apply to the graduate program in speech-language pathology and possess a baccalaureate degree in communication sciences and disorders must meet the following departmental admissions criteria:

  1. A cumulative grade point average of at least a 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. GRE scores.
  3. TOEFL scores for international students for whom English is not the student’s native language.

Please refer to CSDCAS Centralized Application Service website (www.csdcas.org) for more details.

These individuals are admitted directly into the graduate speech-language pathology program.

As of January 1, 2014, individuals applying for certification in speech-language pathology must have completed a course in each of the following areas: biological science, physical science, statistics, and behavioral/social sciences. Acceptable courses in biological sciences should emphasize a content area related to human or animal sciences (e.g., biology, human anatomy and physiology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, human genetics, veterinary science). Acceptable courses in physical sciences should include physics or chemistry. Acceptable courses in social/behavioral sciences should include psychology, sociology, anthropology, or public health. A stand-alone course in statistics is required. Research methodology courses in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) may not be used to satisfy the statistics requirement. A course in biological and physical sciences specifically related to CSD may not be applied for certification purposes to this category unless the course fulfills a university requirement in one of these areas.

Post-Baccalaureate Non-Majors

These students have earned a baccalaureate degree in any discipline other than communication sciences and disorders (e.g., biology, communications, education, English, linguistics).

Graduate Admission Requirements

Students who apply to the graduate program in speech-language pathology and possess a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than communication sciences and disorders or speech-language pathology must have the following admission requirements:

  1. A cumulative grade point average of at least a 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. GRE scores.
  3. TOEFL scores for international students for whom English is not the student’s native language.

Please refer to CSDCAS Centralized Application Service website (www.csdcas.org) for more details.

Before the candidate can begin graduate studies, he or she must successfully complete prerequisite undergraduate courses. These courses provide the individual with the appropriate framework and background in communication sciences and disorders so that he or she will be prepared to enter graduate study. To be granted entry into graduate study, the candidate must complete prerequisite under-graduate coursework with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5, and must have earned a grade of “C-” or better in each of the courses. For any course objectives not mastered, students will be given an assignment to assist them in mastering those objectives. Students cannot take graduate level coursework if they have not mastered all objectives.

Education Specialist Certification Requirements

The Speech-Language Pathology program at Misericordia University is approved to provide Education Specialist Certification for graduate students by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students will need to complete a fieldwork in an educational setting and all coursework, pass the PRAXIS-SLP, and obtain a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology.

Graduation

To graduate with the master of science degree in speech-language pathology, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. Complete all academic coursework.
  2. Complete all clinical practicum requirements.
  3. Pass a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis during the last year of graduate study.
  4. Show evidence of having taken the PRAXIS SLP

Students meeting criteria (1) through (4) above will be eligible for graduation. Traditional 5-year students and undergraduate transfers who have completed both the undergraduate and graduate curricula at Misericordia University will be granted both the bachelor of science degree in health sciences and the master of science degree in speech-language pathology. Students who have completed the graduate curriculum only (i.e., students who earned a baccalaureate degree prior to commencing graduate studies in the speech-language pathology program) will be granted the master of science degree in speech-language pathology.

Statement Concerning Program Accreditation

The master of science education program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310 Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700. Students may also file grievances with ASHA’s Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA). To learn about ASHA’s grievance policy, students can go to the following link: www.asha.org

Probation and Dismissal Criteria

Students need to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or above throughout the first year until the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year to remain in the major. By the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, students need to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above to remain in the major. Students must maintain this 3.5 or above cumulative GPA until the completion of the master’s program (end of the fifth year). If the cumulative GPA is not 3.5 or above at the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, the student will not be allowed to take any SLP courses and will be dismissed from the major.

If the cumulative GPA (from the first year to the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year) falls below 3.3, the student will be placed on probation for one semester. After the semester on probation, if the cumulative GPA (from the first year to the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year) is still below 3.3, the student will be dismissed from the program and cannot take any more SLP classes. If the cumulative GPA is below 3.5 by the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year, the student will be placed on probation for the spring semester of the sophomore year. At the end of the spring semester sophomore year, if the cumulative GPA is not above 3.5, the student will be dismissed from the program and cannot take any more SLP classes. If the cumulative GPA (from the fall semester of the junior year to the end of the fifth year) falls below 3.5, the student will be placed on probation for one semester. After the semester on probation, if the cumulative GPA (from the fall semester of the junior year to the end of the fifth year) is still below 3.5, the student will be dismissed from the program and cannot take any more SLP classes. Enrollment in SLP courses constitutes an understanding and agreement by the students that they can only fall belo the required GPA once during the entire program.

Students must receive a grade of B- or better in all graduate level academic courses (500 and 600 level). If students receive a C+ or lower in any graduate level academic course (excluding clinic), they have one opportunity to retake that course and receive a B- or better. Failure to achieve a grade of B- or better in that repeated course will result in dismissal from the program. If students receivesa C+ or lower in two or more 500 and/or 600 level academic courses, they will be dismissed from the program regardless of the cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed academic course. If students receive a C+ grade or lower in two academic courses in one semester, they will be dismissed from the program and will not have the opportunity to retake those courses regardless of the cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed course. If students receive a C+ grade or lower in an academic course and B- or lower in a 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork in the same semester, they will be dismissed from the program regardless of the cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed class or clinic/fieldwork. If students receive a C+ grade or lower in an academic course and B- or lower in a 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork in two separate semesters, they will be dismissed from the program regardless of the cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed class or clinic/fieldwork.

If students receive a grade of B- or lower in any 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork course, they will be placed on clinical probation. Students will have one opportunity in the following semester to achieve a B or better in a subsequient clinic/fieldwork course. If the failed fieldwork course is in an educational setting in the spring semester, students will need to retake the subsequent fieldwork course in the following fall semester. If students achieve a B or better in a subsequent clinic/fieldwork, the student will be removed from clinical probation; however, the previous failing grade (B- or lower) will remain on the transcript (refer to the Graduate Academics  - Policies and Procedures section of the catalog). If students fail to achieve a grade of B or better in a subsequent 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinic/fieldwork or if they fail a subsequent clinic/fieldwork course, the student will be dismissed from the program. If students fail any two clinic courses and/or fieldwork (or a combination of clinic and a fieldwork), they will be dismissed from the program regardless of cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed clinic.

Students understand that they must pass all comprehensive examination questions as a requirement for graduation. If they fail any question on the first attempt at the written examination, they will return to orally defend the failed question(s). Should they fail to obtain a passing score following the oral component of the comprehensive examination, they will not be permitted to take SLP 620 (Fieldwork II) in the spring semester.  Students will return in 6 weeks to complete a new written comprehensive examination for the subject that was previously failed.  If students pass on the second attempt, they will be allowed to register in the following semester for the SLP 600 level fieldwork course that is applicable to their course of study.  If students were planning to take a fieldwork placement in an educational setting in the spring semester, they will need to wait until the fall semester to complete that fieldwork.  If students fail any portion of the written component of the comprehensive examination on the second attempt, no oral defense will be permitted and the student will be automatically dismissed from the program.

If students are dismissed by a Clinical Instructor or University Clinical Supervisor from any 500 and/or 600 graduate clinic/fieldwork course during a semester, they will be placed on clinical probation and be given a failing clinical grade commensurate with their performance at the time of dismissal (e.g., B- or lower). Students will not be reassigned to a clinic/fieldwork site or placed at another site until the following semester. If students are dismissed from a school placement during the spring semester they will not be placed in another school setting until the fall semester of that year. If they fail to achieve a grade of B or better in a subsequent 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinical/fieldwork or if they fail a subsequent clinic/fieldwork course, they will be dismissed from the program. If they fail any two clinic courses and/or fieldwork (or a combination of clinic and a fieldwork), they will be dismissed from the program regardless of the cumulative GPA or passing a previously failed clinic. Students cannot fail more than one clinic/fieldwork course.

If a students drop enrollment in any 500 and/or 600 level graduate clinical course, they will be placed on clinical probation and receive an IP grade. The student will not be reassigned to a clinic or be placed at another site until the following semester. If students drop their enrollment from a school placement during the spring semester they will not be placed in another school setting until the fall semester of that year. Reasons deemed excusable for choosing to leave any clinic/fieldwork placement are dependent upon the discretion of the Clinical Director.

Students in the SLP program cannot work in the schools under emergency certification and/or will not provide speech therapy services until they receive their master’s degree from Misericordia. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in immediate dismissal from the program.

A positive Criminal Record Check (Federal and/or State), positive Child Abuse History and/or a positive drug screening may result in any of the following: inability to find a clinical placement, delay in clinical placement, dismissal from a clinical placement, inability to obtain professional licensure, legal ramifications, inability to matriculate or continue in the SLP program, and/or inability to meet requirements for graduation from the program. As a result, students may not be able to complete the requirements of the SLP program, may not be eligible for federal or state credentialing/licensing required for practice, and may be dismissed from the program.

Sequence of Required Courses


First Year


Please note that the department may modify the list of courses required in the first year, based upon the prior undergraduate preparation of admitted students.

Choose One

Based upon student interest, one of the following courses may also be recommended:

Total Credits 18

Total Credits 15-18

Second Year


Total Credits 17

* 18 with Diagnostics

Total Credits 17

* 18 with Diagnostics

Final Year


Total Credits 3

* 4 with Diagnostics

Total Credits 3

* 6 with SLP 602 

Total Credits 12

Second Semester


Total Credits 12

Note


Note 1: Students are required to take two clinics (e.g., SLP 505 , SLP 605 , SLP 601 , or SLP 602 ) and are only required to take SLP 560 Differential Diagnosis in Communication Disorders  (3cr) with SLP 555 Diagnostic Clinic in Communication Disorders  (1cr) once and SLP 515 Hearing Seminar  once; Students will be split between the two semesters of SLP 515 Hearing Seminar  (Fall/Spring Graduate I – Senior Year).

Note 2: Students who pursue Education Specialist Certification will need to pass the PRAXIS-SLP and complete a fieldwork in an educational settin

Note 3: Students may need to take SLP 630  – a third field placement until they have satisfied the department’s and ASHA’s certification requirements pertaining to clinical experiences.

Note 4: For prerequisites, please refer to the catalog or advising sheet.

Return to Academic Program Listings Return to: Academic Program Listings